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Museum of the San Ramon Valley celebrates the centennial anniversary of women winning the right to vote

Danville museum to host educational events highlighting 19th Amendment, women's suffrage

Many western states had already enfranchised women with the right to vote prior to the passage of the 19th Amendment, as depicted here in "Awakening" by Henry Mayer. (Image courtesy Museum of the San Ramon Valley)

On Aug. 26, 1920, women in the United States were at least officially given the right to vote with the certification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. To celebrate the centennial anniversary of women winning the right to vote, the Museum of the San Ramon Valley in downtown Danville is planning to hold a series of special social distancing-conscience events.

Sometimes called the Susan B. Anthony amendment in honor of the suffragette leader, the 19th Amendment was introduced to Congress after the mass suffragist movement to prevent the federal government from prohibiting citizens the right to vote on the basis of sex.

The 19th Amendment states that "The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation."

While the amendment officially gave all women the right to vote -- officially the Tennessee legislature became the 36th and final state to ratify the amendment on Aug. 18,1920 -- it would still be many years until the practice was actualized in many states.

To celebrate the historic Amendment, starting on Saturday, the museum will install a free outdoor exhibit to run every Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon through the summer. The exhibit will feature information about women's suffrage with docents (in masks and social distancing) telling stories and answering questions.

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Then on Aug. 20 the museum is set to host an online program "Women Win the Vote in California" from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The program will feature a video of the Women Win the Vote exhibit at the museum and a presentation on the history of woman suffrage provided by the exhibit organizer and museum. After the video, museum staff will be on hand for a special question and answer session.

While the program is free, registration is required on the museum's website.

Located at 205 Railroad Ave., the Museum of the San Ramon Valley has been closed to visitors due to the continued spread of the coronavirus pandemic. Residents can learn more about the 19th Amendment and other events hosted by the museum online at museumsrv.org or by calling 837-3750.

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Museum of the San Ramon Valley celebrates the centennial anniversary of women winning the right to vote

Danville museum to host educational events highlighting 19th Amendment, women's suffrage

by / Danville San Ramon

Uploaded: Wed, Jul 29, 2020, 1:05 pm

On Aug. 26, 1920, women in the United States were at least officially given the right to vote with the certification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. To celebrate the centennial anniversary of women winning the right to vote, the Museum of the San Ramon Valley in downtown Danville is planning to hold a series of special social distancing-conscience events.

Sometimes called the Susan B. Anthony amendment in honor of the suffragette leader, the 19th Amendment was introduced to Congress after the mass suffragist movement to prevent the federal government from prohibiting citizens the right to vote on the basis of sex.

The 19th Amendment states that "The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation."

While the amendment officially gave all women the right to vote -- officially the Tennessee legislature became the 36th and final state to ratify the amendment on Aug. 18,1920 -- it would still be many years until the practice was actualized in many states.

To celebrate the historic Amendment, starting on Saturday, the museum will install a free outdoor exhibit to run every Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon through the summer. The exhibit will feature information about women's suffrage with docents (in masks and social distancing) telling stories and answering questions.

Then on Aug. 20 the museum is set to host an online program "Women Win the Vote in California" from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The program will feature a video of the Women Win the Vote exhibit at the museum and a presentation on the history of woman suffrage provided by the exhibit organizer and museum. After the video, museum staff will be on hand for a special question and answer session.

While the program is free, registration is required on the museum's website.

Located at 205 Railroad Ave., the Museum of the San Ramon Valley has been closed to visitors due to the continued spread of the coronavirus pandemic. Residents can learn more about the 19th Amendment and other events hosted by the museum online at museumsrv.org or by calling 837-3750.

Comments

Dog Patch Duke
Danville
on Jul 29, 2020 at 8:35 pm
Dog Patch Duke, Danville
on Jul 29, 2020 at 8:35 pm
Like this comment

Clearly, women should have always had the right to vote.

However, as backward as some in California tend to think the mid-western "flyover" states are, Utah was the first state to give women the right to vote by ratifying it. The women in Wyoming were actually the first ones to exercise their rights -- only because Wyoming's election was held before Utah's.


Dog Patch Duke
Danville
on Jul 29, 2020 at 9:49 pm
Dog Patch Duke, Danville
on Jul 29, 2020 at 9:49 pm
Like this comment

Also, On November 3, 1896, Martha Hughes Cannon from Utah became the first female State Senator elected in the United States, defeating her own husband, who was also on the ballot.


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