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Dave Hudson, San Ramon's longest-tenured council member, running for mayor

Points to 20-plus years of civic experience, knowledge of local governance

City Councilman Dave Hudson has announced his candidacy for mayor of San Ramon, running on a platform highlighting his extensive experience and knowledge of civic governance.

San Ramon's longest serving elected official Dave Hudson, has announced that he is running for mayor of San Ramon. (Photo by Mike Sedlak)

The longest-tenured council member in the city's history, Hudson said his priorities remain largely similar to his last council campaign in 2018, and target specific issues and projects that he sees as instrumental in creating an even higher standard of living in the community.

Goals listed by Hudson for his mayoral campaign include supporting the continued development of City Center Bishop Ranch, developing new homes in a responsible and environmentally conscience way, improved traffic circulation, the creation of a pedestrian and bike overpass on Bollinger Canyon for the Iron Horse Regional Trail, and of course, tacking the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

"I’ve already started walking neighborhoods and I am having too much fun myself," Hudson told DanvilleSanRamon.com this week. "The priorities are the same as 2018 plus some. Now that we have our City Center open it is the priority to keep it a success. The first five years are extremely important. That makes the COVID-19 path forward the top priority or this City Center will be an uphill battle. I fear the Christmas tree-lighting in San Ramon will be the next event to cancel."

In addition to his 23 years on the San Ramon City Council, Hudson also served more than four on its Planning Commission and two on its Redevelopment Advisory Committee. Hudson also sat as vice mayor four times, and actually served as the city's mayor in 2001 before the position was directly elected.

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A well-known name to many local leaders throughout the Bay Area, Hudson has held the position of board chair for the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, Contra Costa Transportation Authority and Central Contra Costa Transit Authority and as a director on the Association of Bay Area Governments.

Hudson is in the midst of serving a record sixth term on the council, which he hinted at as being a sign that voters approve of his leadership.

"I'd like to (be mayor) for two years and if my council wants me to do it more I'll do it; if somebody else wants to run I'll talk to some people and see if it's not time to get out of the way or go back to District 2," Hudson said. "And that's the way it should be. If you've done it well enough (the voters) will want you around, if you haven't then…"

Touching on the CityWalk Master Plan -- which would see 4,500 housing units developed in the Bishop Ranch property -- Hudson said the plan has received vocal support from multiple regional leaders, and offers San Ramon the opportunity to create needed housing in a centralized area, as opposed to peppered throughout the city.

"We have to build at least 4,500 more homes and reduce vehicle miles traveled. If we spread those homes out all over town, the traffic congestion will increase particularly on Bollinger Canyon Road and we will not make our climate change reduction mandate," he said.

Hudson added that the bridge on the Iron Horse Trail over Bollinger Canyon Road would further support reducing vehicle miles and overall traffic circulation, adding that grants have already been acquired for the project.

"On a separate note, I am concerned about the increase in speed limits within city limits," he added. "The city can’t change these posted speed limits without adhering to CHP guidelines. Still 50 miles per hour inside our borders is borderline for safety. I’m concerned about drivers cutting through from 580 and exceeding the 50 mph speed limit. Our next survey is in 5 years and we may need to do something to let our residents know their actions determine the speed limit to be posted."

Hudson is running with a so-called "safe seat" on the City Council, as he's in the middle of a four-year term he won in 2018.

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Dave Hudson, San Ramon's longest-tenured council member, running for mayor

Points to 20-plus years of civic experience, knowledge of local governance

by / Danville San Ramon

Uploaded: Fri, Aug 7, 2020, 2:14 pm
Updated: Sun, Aug 9, 2020, 2:48 pm

City Councilman Dave Hudson has announced his candidacy for mayor of San Ramon, running on a platform highlighting his extensive experience and knowledge of civic governance.

The longest-tenured council member in the city's history, Hudson said his priorities remain largely similar to his last council campaign in 2018, and target specific issues and projects that he sees as instrumental in creating an even higher standard of living in the community.

Goals listed by Hudson for his mayoral campaign include supporting the continued development of City Center Bishop Ranch, developing new homes in a responsible and environmentally conscience way, improved traffic circulation, the creation of a pedestrian and bike overpass on Bollinger Canyon for the Iron Horse Regional Trail, and of course, tacking the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

"I’ve already started walking neighborhoods and I am having too much fun myself," Hudson told DanvilleSanRamon.com this week. "The priorities are the same as 2018 plus some. Now that we have our City Center open it is the priority to keep it a success. The first five years are extremely important. That makes the COVID-19 path forward the top priority or this City Center will be an uphill battle. I fear the Christmas tree-lighting in San Ramon will be the next event to cancel."

In addition to his 23 years on the San Ramon City Council, Hudson also served more than four on its Planning Commission and two on its Redevelopment Advisory Committee. Hudson also sat as vice mayor four times, and actually served as the city's mayor in 2001 before the position was directly elected.

A well-known name to many local leaders throughout the Bay Area, Hudson has held the position of board chair for the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, Contra Costa Transportation Authority and Central Contra Costa Transit Authority and as a director on the Association of Bay Area Governments.

Hudson is in the midst of serving a record sixth term on the council, which he hinted at as being a sign that voters approve of his leadership.

"I'd like to (be mayor) for two years and if my council wants me to do it more I'll do it; if somebody else wants to run I'll talk to some people and see if it's not time to get out of the way or go back to District 2," Hudson said. "And that's the way it should be. If you've done it well enough (the voters) will want you around, if you haven't then…"

Touching on the CityWalk Master Plan -- which would see 4,500 housing units developed in the Bishop Ranch property -- Hudson said the plan has received vocal support from multiple regional leaders, and offers San Ramon the opportunity to create needed housing in a centralized area, as opposed to peppered throughout the city.

"We have to build at least 4,500 more homes and reduce vehicle miles traveled. If we spread those homes out all over town, the traffic congestion will increase particularly on Bollinger Canyon Road and we will not make our climate change reduction mandate," he said.

Hudson added that the bridge on the Iron Horse Trail over Bollinger Canyon Road would further support reducing vehicle miles and overall traffic circulation, adding that grants have already been acquired for the project.

"On a separate note, I am concerned about the increase in speed limits within city limits," he added. "The city can’t change these posted speed limits without adhering to CHP guidelines. Still 50 miles per hour inside our borders is borderline for safety. I’m concerned about drivers cutting through from 580 and exceeding the 50 mph speed limit. Our next survey is in 5 years and we may need to do something to let our residents know their actions determine the speed limit to be posted."

Hudson is running with a so-called "safe seat" on the City Council, as he's in the middle of a four-year term he won in 2018.

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