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Rare badger spotted, caught on camera east of Mount Diablo

A rare badger sighting was recorded by members of an East Bay environmentalist group earlier this month as they were walking along a rural road between Antioch and Mt. Diablo.

Members of the Save Sand Creek Steering Committee were taking a hike on Nov. 8 to celebrate the passage of Measure T, a citywide ballot initiative that limits development in the Sand Creek area.

As they were strolling along, they spotted a juvenile American badger, which "vanished" from the area in the 1970s but is making a comeback due to preservation efforts, according to a newsletter sent out by Save Mount Diablo on Friday.

"The badger highlights the importance of preserving and protecting Mount Diablo's lands," according to the newsletter.

"Each badger pair needs about 3,000 acres of land for its territory. Now that more than 120,000 acres has been preserved and is managed for wildlife in the Diablo region, badgers are continuing to return," the newsletter says.

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The badger video can be seen here.

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Rare badger spotted, caught on camera east of Mount Diablo

Uploaded: Sat, Nov 21, 2020, 9:25 pm

A rare badger sighting was recorded by members of an East Bay environmentalist group earlier this month as they were walking along a rural road between Antioch and Mt. Diablo.

Members of the Save Sand Creek Steering Committee were taking a hike on Nov. 8 to celebrate the passage of Measure T, a citywide ballot initiative that limits development in the Sand Creek area.

As they were strolling along, they spotted a juvenile American badger, which "vanished" from the area in the 1970s but is making a comeback due to preservation efforts, according to a newsletter sent out by Save Mount Diablo on Friday.

"The badger highlights the importance of preserving and protecting Mount Diablo's lands," according to the newsletter.

"Each badger pair needs about 3,000 acres of land for its territory. Now that more than 120,000 acres has been preserved and is managed for wildlife in the Diablo region, badgers are continuing to return," the newsletter says.

The badger video can be seen here.

— Bay City News Service

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