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Tri-Valley ranks high among Bay Area communities for pavement quality

Dublin comes in second place overall; Danville among those rated 'very good'

In a recently released survey of pavement conditions throughout the Bay Area, the Tri-Valley cities of Dublin, Pleasanton, Livermore and San Ramon and the town of Danville collectively earned high marks compared to some other parts of the region, with Dublin earning the highest score locally.

The Metropolitan Transportation Commission released results from its 2020 Bay Area pavement condition index (PCI) last month, which ranks the pavement quality of communities in the region on a scale of 1 to 100, highlighting improvements or declines in the conditions of paved streets, roads and sidewalks across the Bay Area's wide range of communities.

PCI scores of 90 or above are considered "excellent", according to the survey, with scores of 80 to 89 being "very good"; scores of 70 to 79 being "good"; scores of 60 to 69 being "fair;" scores of 50 to 59 being "at risk;" and scores of 25 to 49 being "poor."

All incorporated Tri-Valley communities received PCI scores in the range of "good" or "very good" last year -- and more than 10 points ahead of the average score of 67 and rank of "fair" across all Bay Area communities.

In the 2020 rankings, Dublin came in second for pavement condition among Bay Area cities, with a PCI score of 84 out of a possible 100 points in the survey, narrowly edged out of first place by Cupertino, which had a score of 85.

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Dublin's score had decreased by one point each year in 2019 and 2020, while Cupertino's rose by one point from 2019 in order to overcome Dublin's previous first-place score among Bay Area communities.

Danville joined Dublin among jurisdictions ranked as "very good," despite being further down the list, with a score of 80. The town had the same score in 2019, which had been boosted by a point that year compared to its 2018 score of 79.

Livermore narrowly edged out the remaining incorporated Tri-Valley communities with a score of 79 -- the same as the city's 2019 score, which saw it gain a point from 78 in 2018.

Pleasanton and San Ramon both ranked at 78, with Pleasanton losing a point from its 2019 score of 79, and San Ramon holding steady from the previous year.

Unincorporated communities in Contra Costa County collectively ranked at 71 in 2020, down a point from 72 in 2018 and 2019. In Alameda County, unincorporated areas saw the reverse, gaining a point in 2020 for a score of 72, up from 71 in the previous two years.

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At the county level, Contra Costa County collectively ranked high in the Bay Area, coming in third behind San Francisco and San Mateo counties in last year's data, with a score of 70, which was steady across the three years of data.

Although outranked by San Mateo County, which had a score of 71, Contra Costa County had the additional distinction of no jurisdictions included in the lowest rankings, while Pacifica, in San Mateo County, was at the bottom of the list, with the lowest score of all Bay Area jurisdictions, at 42.

Alameda County collectively ranked further down in the list, below Santa Clara County, and tied with Solano County at an average score of 68.

More information, including full results of the most recent Bay Area PCI survey, is available here.

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Tri-Valley ranks high among Bay Area communities for pavement quality

Dublin comes in second place overall; Danville among those rated 'very good'

by / Danville San Ramon

Uploaded: Sun, Dec 5, 2021, 3:04 pm

In a recently released survey of pavement conditions throughout the Bay Area, the Tri-Valley cities of Dublin, Pleasanton, Livermore and San Ramon and the town of Danville collectively earned high marks compared to some other parts of the region, with Dublin earning the highest score locally.

The Metropolitan Transportation Commission released results from its 2020 Bay Area pavement condition index (PCI) last month, which ranks the pavement quality of communities in the region on a scale of 1 to 100, highlighting improvements or declines in the conditions of paved streets, roads and sidewalks across the Bay Area's wide range of communities.

PCI scores of 90 or above are considered "excellent", according to the survey, with scores of 80 to 89 being "very good"; scores of 70 to 79 being "good"; scores of 60 to 69 being "fair;" scores of 50 to 59 being "at risk;" and scores of 25 to 49 being "poor."

All incorporated Tri-Valley communities received PCI scores in the range of "good" or "very good" last year -- and more than 10 points ahead of the average score of 67 and rank of "fair" across all Bay Area communities.

In the 2020 rankings, Dublin came in second for pavement condition among Bay Area cities, with a PCI score of 84 out of a possible 100 points in the survey, narrowly edged out of first place by Cupertino, which had a score of 85.

Dublin's score had decreased by one point each year in 2019 and 2020, while Cupertino's rose by one point from 2019 in order to overcome Dublin's previous first-place score among Bay Area communities.

Danville joined Dublin among jurisdictions ranked as "very good," despite being further down the list, with a score of 80. The town had the same score in 2019, which had been boosted by a point that year compared to its 2018 score of 79.

Livermore narrowly edged out the remaining incorporated Tri-Valley communities with a score of 79 -- the same as the city's 2019 score, which saw it gain a point from 78 in 2018.

Pleasanton and San Ramon both ranked at 78, with Pleasanton losing a point from its 2019 score of 79, and San Ramon holding steady from the previous year.

Unincorporated communities in Contra Costa County collectively ranked at 71 in 2020, down a point from 72 in 2018 and 2019. In Alameda County, unincorporated areas saw the reverse, gaining a point in 2020 for a score of 72, up from 71 in the previous two years.

At the county level, Contra Costa County collectively ranked high in the Bay Area, coming in third behind San Francisco and San Mateo counties in last year's data, with a score of 70, which was steady across the three years of data.

Although outranked by San Mateo County, which had a score of 71, Contra Costa County had the additional distinction of no jurisdictions included in the lowest rankings, while Pacifica, in San Mateo County, was at the bottom of the list, with the lowest score of all Bay Area jurisdictions, at 42.

Alameda County collectively ranked further down in the list, below Santa Clara County, and tied with Solano County at an average score of 68.

More information, including full results of the most recent Bay Area PCI survey, is available here.

Comments

Paul Clark
Registered user
Danville
on Dec 7, 2021 at 8:09 am
Paul Clark, Danville
Registered user
on Dec 7, 2021 at 8:09 am

We've lived off of El Pintado Road since 1984. Neither the County, nor the Town of Danville have EVER done any substantial maintenance on El Pintado in that time frame. In times past we and our neighbors have gone to The Town of Danville for relief. The answers have been manifold. "The people like it the way it is." "We are waiting for money from the development of fronting properties." "There is no consensus as to what should be done." Etc. I cannot count the number of times I met with Steve Lake when he was "Public Works Director." He had the "lie du jour"all cued up for me each time we met, and none of them were ever the same. But the truth of the matter is that Danville's "policy" is to maintain the roads that are in decent shape and let the rest go with filling the potholes. I have a very good friend who lives on Richard Lane. When he comes to visit, he cannot understand why they seal coat Richard Lane to death, but never do anything about El Pintado. So now, Danville says that they are going to spend $500k on El Pintado doing a "pavement overlay," which is just throwing good money after bad. The money would be better spent actually doing a complete rebuilding of portions of the road over a longer period of time, including fixing the drainage, which causes the roadway to fail in the first place. Doing overlays on poor quality sub-base is a fool's mission.


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