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Dougherty Valley freshman places third in Swalwell's App Challenge

HealthBuddy aims to help cancer patients and doctors understand symptoms, treatments

U.S. Rep. Eric Swalwell announced the top finishers for the Congressional App Challenge in his District 15 this month, with projects from students from American High School in Fremont taking first and second places, and Dougherty Valley High School freshman Aryan Agrawal earning third place.

Agrawal was the only San Ramon student to place high in the challenge, as well as the only ninth-grader -- with second and first place prizes going to 10th- and 11th-graders.

"My motivation to build HealthBuddy came after I saw my grandfather, who we lost to cancer, struggle to keep … records to share with his doctor because of paper sheets given to him." Agrawal said, in a video showcasing the app.

The app is meant to help cancer patients keep track of their appointments and symptoms in a way that makes it easy to share with their doctors. The goal is for doctors to select the best treatment possible based on the full range of symptoms patients are recording.

Agrawal developed the iPhone app using machine learning, in particular an artificial neural network, intended to help doctors make decisions by evaluating patient symptoms that are input, and outputting a suggestion for the best treatment option.

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The app enables patients to keep track of their appointments, as well as any notes to share with doctors at those appointments. It additionally offers an area to input and track pain details, as well as side effects. This information can be sorted and filtered, and a button on the app allows patients to share the information with their doctors.

On their end, doctors are able to use the app to see a list of their patients, the symptoms they're reporting, and the treatments they're receiving. Doctor's are able to click on a "predict" button, at which point the neural network model presents them with a list of suggested medications based symptoms.

“I’m always awed by the quality of our young coders’ work in the Congressional App Challenge, and this year is no different,” Swalwell said. “Protecting against online harassment, a fitness tracker for smartphone users’ eyes, and helping cancer patients record their own medical data – these are the kinds of apps that improve our community’s quality of life, truly coding that cares. Congratulations to our winners.”

Coming in at second place in the district-wide competition was American High junior Meryl Matthew, for an app called Vision which aims to detect signs of eye strain using video and promote eye health.

First place went to American High sophomores Joel Johnson, Aryaman Kukal, Chaitya Jodhavat and Sriram Natarajan, for ChatGuard, which is aimed at protecting against online harassment.

More information on the Congressional App Challenge is available here.

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Jeanita Lyman joined the Pleasanton Weekly in September 2020 and covers the Danville and San Ramon beat. She studied journalism at Skyline College and Mills College while covering the Peninsula for the San Mateo Daily Journal, after moving back to the area in 2013. Read more >>

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Dougherty Valley freshman places third in Swalwell's App Challenge

HealthBuddy aims to help cancer patients and doctors understand symptoms, treatments

by / Danville San Ramon

Uploaded: Thu, Jan 27, 2022, 11:17 pm

U.S. Rep. Eric Swalwell announced the top finishers for the Congressional App Challenge in his District 15 this month, with projects from students from American High School in Fremont taking first and second places, and Dougherty Valley High School freshman Aryan Agrawal earning third place.

Agrawal was the only San Ramon student to place high in the challenge, as well as the only ninth-grader -- with second and first place prizes going to 10th- and 11th-graders.

"My motivation to build HealthBuddy came after I saw my grandfather, who we lost to cancer, struggle to keep … records to share with his doctor because of paper sheets given to him." Agrawal said, in a video showcasing the app.

The app is meant to help cancer patients keep track of their appointments and symptoms in a way that makes it easy to share with their doctors. The goal is for doctors to select the best treatment possible based on the full range of symptoms patients are recording.

Agrawal developed the iPhone app using machine learning, in particular an artificial neural network, intended to help doctors make decisions by evaluating patient symptoms that are input, and outputting a suggestion for the best treatment option.

The app enables patients to keep track of their appointments, as well as any notes to share with doctors at those appointments. It additionally offers an area to input and track pain details, as well as side effects. This information can be sorted and filtered, and a button on the app allows patients to share the information with their doctors.

On their end, doctors are able to use the app to see a list of their patients, the symptoms they're reporting, and the treatments they're receiving. Doctor's are able to click on a "predict" button, at which point the neural network model presents them with a list of suggested medications based symptoms.

“I’m always awed by the quality of our young coders’ work in the Congressional App Challenge, and this year is no different,” Swalwell said. “Protecting against online harassment, a fitness tracker for smartphone users’ eyes, and helping cancer patients record their own medical data – these are the kinds of apps that improve our community’s quality of life, truly coding that cares. Congratulations to our winners.”

Coming in at second place in the district-wide competition was American High junior Meryl Matthew, for an app called Vision which aims to detect signs of eye strain using video and promote eye health.

First place went to American High sophomores Joel Johnson, Aryaman Kukal, Chaitya Jodhavat and Sriram Natarajan, for ChatGuard, which is aimed at protecting against online harassment.

More information on the Congressional App Challenge is available here.

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