News

Livingston wins fourth term as Contra Costa County sheriff

Incumbent leads challenger Therriault by 36,000+ votes with only 7,400 ballots left to tally

Contra Costa County Sheriff-Coroner David Livingston is poised to serve for a fourth term, defeating a challenge to his seat -- for the first time in his 11-plus years on the job -- from Richmond police union president and county political newcomer Benjamin Therriault.

David Livingston. (Contributed photo)

According to the latest results from the June 7 primary, Livingston stands at 58.77% of the vote, a dip from his Election Night position of 61.6% but still a substantial lead of 36,857 votes with only 7,000-plus ballots left to process, according to county election officials. Therriault, who has worked as an officer and detective in the Richmond Police Department since 2009, sits at 41.23% of the vote.

Livingston had not responded to a request for comment nor issued a public campaign statement in victory as of Tuesday evening.

For his part, Therriault and his campaign have declined to officially concede the race until all remaining ballots are counted.

"Our campaign definitely wants all the ballots counted, and there will be no concession of any kind until they are officially certified," Therriault told DanvilleSanRamon.

Help sustain the local news you depend on.

Your contribution matters. Become a member today.

Join

In the midst of recent controversy in Livingston's office in the wake of two high-profile deadly police shootings in Danville by now-former sheriff's deputy Andrew Hall, and Livingston's continued support for Hall amidst his conviction for assault and six-year prison sentence, Therriault seemed to have some momentum and support going into his campaign.

The challenger ran on a platform that highlighted police reform and accountability, gaining leverage with a large portion of voters who have been critical and increasingly skeptical of present-day policing practices both locally and nationally.

Livingston, however, had more than a decade of experience on the job, and a history of leading a department that county residents rely on and even more years in law enforcement upper administration, which he emphasized during his campaign.

Prior to being elected as sheriff-coroner in 2010, Livingston served as chief of Pleasant Hill Police Department starting in 2002, then moving on to lead the Concord Police Department in 2005. He began his career as an officer in the Fremont Police Department.

"We have high standards in the office of the sheriff; we hold people accountable regardless of their position; we've got great diversity throughout the agency," Livingston said during a candidates forum moderated by the DanvilleSanRamon editorial team.

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox in our Express newsletter.

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox in our Express newsletter.

"The community universally tells us that they're pleased with the services we provide," Livingston continued. "There are occasional incidents, there was obviously the shooting case in Danville that garnered much attention, but in the meantime the deputies in the field handled over 40,000 calls for service during the same year period."

Livingston also sought to appeal to county voters who have been shaken by high-profile crimes, such as organized retail theft and the ongoing issue of catalytic converter thefts throughout the county, as well as health and safety risks posed by the burgeoning fentanyl crisis.

Livingston was endorsed in his latest campaign against Therriault by local elected officials including District 2 supervisor Candace Andersen, all members of the Danville Town Council, and San Ramon Councilmember Scott Perkins. He also boasted county level endorsements from the Contra Costa Deputy Sheriff's Association, Auditor Robert Campbell, Treasurer Russell Watts, and Assessor Gus Kramer, who also beat off a challenger in the June primary, according to the current ballot count.

The last time Livingston faced a challenger was during his first run for the position in 2010, in which he successfully campaigned against Brian Kalinowski for the seat being vacated by retirement Warren Rupf after 18 years on the job.

With the Contra Costa County Elections Division reporting 7,400 ballots left to process as of Tuesday, Livingston's re-election victory in the June primary would seem certain mathematically. However, Therriault's refusal to concede until results are certified means that an official announcement from his campaign could continue to be pending until as late as July 7, which is the deadline for the county to certify election results.

Regardless, Therriault said that the move was a matter of principle, in highlighting the need to count all votes. Therriault said that his first-ever campaign had already impacted discourse around the sheriff-coroner's role in the way he'd hoped to.

Benjamin Therriault. (Contributed photo)

"The campaign has pushed the dial forward," Therriault said. "Statements and promises have been made that I believe will force whomever wins to be held to answer for their conduct in this important elected position."

Following the certification of election results, Livingston is set to be sworn in for his fourth term in office in January, and set to remain in the position through January 2027.

A front row seat to local high school sports.

Check out our new newsletter, the Playbook.

Jeanita Lyman joined the Pleasanton Weekly in September 2020 and covers the Danville and San Ramon beat. She studied journalism at Skyline College and Mills College while covering the Peninsula for the San Mateo Daily Journal, after moving back to the area in 2013. Read more >>

Follow DanvilleSanRamon.com on Twitter @DanvilleSanRamo, Facebook and on Instagram @ for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Stay informed on important law enforcement news. Sign up for our FREE daily Express newsletter.

Livingston wins fourth term as Contra Costa County sheriff

Incumbent leads challenger Therriault by 36,000+ votes with only 7,400 ballots left to tally

by / Danville San Ramon

Uploaded: Tue, Jun 14, 2022, 10:46 pm

Contra Costa County Sheriff-Coroner David Livingston is poised to serve for a fourth term, defeating a challenge to his seat -- for the first time in his 11-plus years on the job -- from Richmond police union president and county political newcomer Benjamin Therriault.

According to the latest results from the June 7 primary, Livingston stands at 58.77% of the vote, a dip from his Election Night position of 61.6% but still a substantial lead of 36,857 votes with only 7,000-plus ballots left to process, according to county election officials. Therriault, who has worked as an officer and detective in the Richmond Police Department since 2009, sits at 41.23% of the vote.

Livingston had not responded to a request for comment nor issued a public campaign statement in victory as of Tuesday evening.

For his part, Therriault and his campaign have declined to officially concede the race until all remaining ballots are counted.

"Our campaign definitely wants all the ballots counted, and there will be no concession of any kind until they are officially certified," Therriault told DanvilleSanRamon.

In the midst of recent controversy in Livingston's office in the wake of two high-profile deadly police shootings in Danville by now-former sheriff's deputy Andrew Hall, and Livingston's continued support for Hall amidst his conviction for assault and six-year prison sentence, Therriault seemed to have some momentum and support going into his campaign.

The challenger ran on a platform that highlighted police reform and accountability, gaining leverage with a large portion of voters who have been critical and increasingly skeptical of present-day policing practices both locally and nationally.

Livingston, however, had more than a decade of experience on the job, and a history of leading a department that county residents rely on and even more years in law enforcement upper administration, which he emphasized during his campaign.

Prior to being elected as sheriff-coroner in 2010, Livingston served as chief of Pleasant Hill Police Department starting in 2002, then moving on to lead the Concord Police Department in 2005. He began his career as an officer in the Fremont Police Department.

"We have high standards in the office of the sheriff; we hold people accountable regardless of their position; we've got great diversity throughout the agency," Livingston said during a candidates forum moderated by the DanvilleSanRamon editorial team.

"The community universally tells us that they're pleased with the services we provide," Livingston continued. "There are occasional incidents, there was obviously the shooting case in Danville that garnered much attention, but in the meantime the deputies in the field handled over 40,000 calls for service during the same year period."

Livingston also sought to appeal to county voters who have been shaken by high-profile crimes, such as organized retail theft and the ongoing issue of catalytic converter thefts throughout the county, as well as health and safety risks posed by the burgeoning fentanyl crisis.

Livingston was endorsed in his latest campaign against Therriault by local elected officials including District 2 supervisor Candace Andersen, all members of the Danville Town Council, and San Ramon Councilmember Scott Perkins. He also boasted county level endorsements from the Contra Costa Deputy Sheriff's Association, Auditor Robert Campbell, Treasurer Russell Watts, and Assessor Gus Kramer, who also beat off a challenger in the June primary, according to the current ballot count.

The last time Livingston faced a challenger was during his first run for the position in 2010, in which he successfully campaigned against Brian Kalinowski for the seat being vacated by retirement Warren Rupf after 18 years on the job.

With the Contra Costa County Elections Division reporting 7,400 ballots left to process as of Tuesday, Livingston's re-election victory in the June primary would seem certain mathematically. However, Therriault's refusal to concede until results are certified means that an official announcement from his campaign could continue to be pending until as late as July 7, which is the deadline for the county to certify election results.

Regardless, Therriault said that the move was a matter of principle, in highlighting the need to count all votes. Therriault said that his first-ever campaign had already impacted discourse around the sheriff-coroner's role in the way he'd hoped to.

"The campaign has pushed the dial forward," Therriault said. "Statements and promises have been made that I believe will force whomever wins to be held to answer for their conduct in this important elected position."

Following the certification of election results, Livingston is set to be sworn in for his fourth term in office in January, and set to remain in the position through January 2027.

Comments

Malcolm Hex
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jun 16, 2022 at 8:34 am
Malcolm Hex, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jun 16, 2022 at 8:34 am

Congratulations, Sheriff Livingston! Job well done. As for Mr. Therriault, I understand that he will not concede the election, until all votes are counted—even though, mathematically speaking, he can't win. That's ego talking, not a matter of principle.


Jeff Husted
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jun 16, 2022 at 10:58 am
Jeff Husted, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jun 16, 2022 at 10:58 am

Mathematically speaking, Sheriff Livingston has officially won re-election and this speaks clearly of what most Contra Costa County resident voters are seeking and expecting of their County Sheriff's Department.

His questionable defense and support of two wrongful police killings by the same officer raises some red flags but this incident is now water under the bridge as the deputy has now been roghtfully sentenced to prison.

Kudos to Contra Costa County DA Diana Becton for getting to the bottom of things.


Dontrelle Jackson
Registered user
another community
on Jun 16, 2022 at 11:10 am
Dontrelle Jackson, another community
Registered user
on Jun 16, 2022 at 11:10 am

For Mr. Therriault to challenge the outcome of this election is a waste of time unless he adheres to POTUS45 fallacies and strategies.

The voters of Contra Costa County have clearly made their choice...law & order with no constraints other than possible intervention by the District Attorney's office.


Jeremy Sloane
Registered user
another community
on Jun 16, 2022 at 1:18 pm
Jeremy Sloane, another community
Registered user
on Jun 16, 2022 at 1:18 pm

Hopefully newly re-elected Sheriff Sloane will strive to improve inmate conditions at the three Contra Costa County jails including better food, expanded commissary options, and more expedient medical attention.

Improved outbound telephone service (with the possible allowance of inmate cellphones) would also be a step in the right direction along with adding modern gym facilities and a recreation/arcade room for those serving time for minor offenses.


Malcolm Hex
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jun 18, 2022 at 8:16 am
Malcolm Hex, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jun 18, 2022 at 8:16 am

@Halsted

Still unhappy about your boy over there in SF being ousted? Gascon is next, buddy. The pendulum is starting to swing back the other way.


Jeff Husted
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jun 18, 2022 at 2:34 pm
Jeff Husted, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jun 18, 2022 at 2:34 pm

@Hex

BTW it's Husted not Halsted [sic].

What goes on in San Francisco or Los Angeles is of no concern to me.

Contra Costa County is another matter.

We need full transparency and accountability on the part of law enforcement.

And if their actions are cleared by DA Becton, the police have nothing to fear as some interventions are justifiable while others may not be, depending upon the situation.

The 'shoot first, ask questions later' approach might be OK for Tombstone but not in modern day Contra Costa County.


Marianne Peters
Registered user
Danville
on Jun 18, 2022 at 2:59 pm
Marianne Peters, Danville
Registered user
on Jun 18, 2022 at 2:59 pm

If both police shootings/murders were justified as per Sheriff Livingston's view, why did Contra Costa County agree to pay a settlement of $9.4 million to the families of the two deceased victims?

Diana Becton got to the bottom of things and the deputy is now in prison.


Mary Livingston
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jun 19, 2022 at 9:48 am
Mary Livingston, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jun 19, 2022 at 9:48 am

> If both police shootings/murders were justified as per Sheriff Livingston's view, why did Contra Costa County agree to pay a settlement of $9.4 million to the families of the two deceased victims?

^ Because video cam recordings of both incidents clearly proved to the court that the shootings were not justified by any means of the word.


Melissa Taylor
Registered user
Alamo
on Jun 19, 2022 at 11:25 am
Melissa Taylor, Alamo
Registered user
on Jun 19, 2022 at 11:25 am

The sheriff should not be head of both the county sheriff's department and the county coroner's office.

This is a conflict of interest when it comes to investigating wrongful police shootings.

Fortunately the county has DA Diana Becton to keep things in check.


Malcolm Hex
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jun 21, 2022 at 9:43 pm
Malcolm Hex, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jun 21, 2022 at 9:43 pm

@Halstead

You regurgitate the same woke rhetoric as your fellow lefties. The only problem is that your knowledge, or lack thereof, comes across as juvenile - in part because you have no experience in law enforcement.

As far as Becton goes, ask yourself why she took so long to charge Hall. What Becton saw was all of these progressive district attorneys engaged in a “movement.” In fact, Chesa Boudin used that very word to describe how he was going to enforce the law. Didn’t turn out so good for him, did it?

Becton knows what happened to Boudin, and she knows the same thing can happen to her. I suggest you pay close attention as to how she handles the second shooting regarding the suspect with a knife.

Oh, and one more thing: Hall was never charged with murder. He was convicted of voluntary manslaughter.


The Dude
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jun 21, 2022 at 9:58 pm
The Dude, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jun 21, 2022 at 9:58 pm

Lolz. Nobody considers anything Becton is doing as keeping anything in check.


Jamal Washington
Registered user
another community
on Jun 22, 2022 at 7:41 am
Jamal Washington, another community
Registered user
on Jun 22, 2022 at 7:41 am

DA Becton is keeping questionable police improprieties in check.

@Malcom Hex
Murder & voluntary manslaughter still involve the wrongful killing of someone.

Deputy Hall was fortunate that the prosecutor's office went easy on him...six years instead of 25 to life.

The former & disgraced law enforcement officer will probably get released early due to 'good behavior' while incarcerated
and then he can return to a welcoming in Danville.


Jim Creighton
Registered user
Walnut Creek
on Jun 22, 2022 at 8:41 am
Jim Creighton, Walnut Creek
Registered user
on Jun 22, 2022 at 8:41 am

Rogue cops and overly permissive DAs are not doing society any favors and both must be 'kept in check'.


Malcolm Hex
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jun 22, 2022 at 8:45 am
Malcolm Hex, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jun 22, 2022 at 8:45 am

@Mary Livingston

You stated the following: “If both police shootings/murders were justified as per Sheriff Livingston's view, why did Contra Costa County agree to pay a settlement of $9.4 million to the families of the two deceased victims?”

Answer: TO AVOID LITIGATION

If those cases had been litigated in a civil court, and the County lost, the cost to the County could have been twice the amount paid out to the plaintiffs. Why? The lawsuit process can take a significant amount of time. Before a trial begins, there are investigations, pre-trial motions, insurance claims, medical evaluations, and more. The costs are staggering.

A settlement doesn't usually include an admission of guilt; it doesn't say anyone was right or wrong in the case. A settlement agreement may include a "no admission of liability" clause.

Also, you stated video cam recordings of both incidents clearly proved to the court that the shootings were not justified by any means. Really? The second case you speak of (the guy with a knife I presume) has not been litigated. In other words, there has NOT been a verdict reached in that case.

Fact check.



Malcolm Hex
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jun 22, 2022 at 9:26 am
Malcolm Hex, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jun 22, 2022 at 9:26 am

The California Penal Code Section 187 applies to murders that are premeditated or specified in the criminal statutes, Jamal. Mr. Hall was found guilty of voluntary manslaughter, not murder.

Also, you said Becton went easy on the defendant. Not the case. Becton could not charge the defendant with murder, based on the very definition of the word - which I noted above.

Lastly, you mentioned that the defendant could have received 25 to life. Wrong again. In California, voluntary manslaughter is a felony and could result in the following penalties: Three, six, or eleven years in California state prison.

Fact checked


Jesse Arejo
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jun 22, 2022 at 9:34 am
Jesse Arejo, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jun 22, 2022 at 9:34 am

Danville will lose the second case as well because the family survivors have a very outspoken civil rights attorney who will add further negative publicity to the case.

And to avoid additional legal expenditures and public outcry, the city will eventually settle out of court to avoid further embarrassment and humiliation.


Melinda Dillon
Registered user
Walnut Creek
on Jun 22, 2022 at 10:03 am
Melinda Dillon, Walnut Creek
Registered user
on Jun 22, 2022 at 10:03 am

Where are these perpetrators coming from as they are obviously not Walnut Creek/Danville/San Ramon/Blackhawk residents.

680 is most likely the fastest access and escape route unless they are using public transportation.

Local residents have a right to be concerned as their upwardly mobile possessions and property easily attracts thieves.

Maybe the key is to be less materialistic and more humanistic.


Jeff Husted
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jun 22, 2022 at 10:17 am
Jeff Husted, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jun 22, 2022 at 10:17 am

It is obvious that in addition to being charged and convicted of 'involuntary manslaughter', Officer Hall used excessive force as his life was not being threatened in any manner.

Thus self-defense could not be used as a viable defense.

Firing nine rounds into a car going less than 5 mph and shooting a mentally ill transient tossing small rocks at nothing hardly warrants two 'justifiable' police shootings.

Save the ammo for the real crooks.


Malcolm Hex
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jun 22, 2022 at 10:28 am
Malcolm Hex, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jun 22, 2022 at 10:28 am

@Jesse

Contra Costa County paid $4.5 million to the family of the suspect with the knife. The DA's Office investigation into the suspects death is ongoing, with no word whether they'll pursue criminal charges against the defendant. In other words, the civil part of this case has already been settled. Settling a civil case, however, does not make the criminal case go away - if in fact the defendant is charged.


Malcolm Hex
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jun 22, 2022 at 11:01 am
Malcolm Hex, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jun 22, 2022 at 11:01 am

@Halstead

You left out the part where the suspect took out a knife and pointed it towards the officer.


Jeff Husted
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jun 22, 2022 at 11:24 am
Jeff Husted, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jun 22, 2022 at 11:24 am

"You left out the part where the suspect took out a knife and pointed it towards the officer."
@Malcolm X
The suspect's hands were DOWN while holding a dinky pocketknife and Officer Hall was standing nearly 8-10 feet away.

Was this a justifiable police shooting in your opinion?

Was the officer's life in eminant danger?

If justified, he wouldn't have been convicted...even in Contra Costa County.


Sally Denkins
Registered user
Danville
on Jun 22, 2022 at 3:25 pm
Sally Denkins, Danville
Registered user
on Jun 22, 2022 at 3:25 pm

I think a taser would have sufficed given the situation.

Then again, it was the officer's decision to commit voluntary manslaughter.

While the shooting was not premeditated, it provided an opportunity for now-convictrd officer to express his inherent prejudice towards two suspects of color.


Malcolm Hex
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jun 22, 2022 at 3:58 pm
Malcolm Hex, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jun 22, 2022 at 3:58 pm

Until then, Halsteed, the district attorney will investigate to see if in fact a crime has been committed.


Lillian Jacobs
Registered user
another community
on Jun 22, 2022 at 4:07 pm
Lillian Jacobs, another community
Registered user
on Jun 22, 2022 at 4:07 pm

If it is determined that another crime has been committed, hopefully the court will add another six years to the sentence.


Don't miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.

Post a comment

Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.