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San Ramon Regional acquires new robotic system for spinal surgery

ExcelsiusGPS system to make procedures more accurate

San Ramon Regional Medical Center recently announced that it has become the first hospital in the Bay Area to purchase the ExcelsiusGPS system for robotic-assisted spine surgery.

Designed to improve safety and accuracy of spine surgical procedures within the operating room, hospital officials say the new technology provides improved and real-time visualization of patient anatomy.

“What’s remarkable about this new robotic technology is that it simplifies more complicated surgeries for spine surgeons,” said Hieu Ball, M.D., Orthopedic Spine Surgeon at San Ramon Regional Medical Center. “We are able to see and do more along the spine than ever before. Patients undergoing spine surgery can have a whole new level of safety and peace of mind with their procedure.”

The ExcelsiusGPS combines a rigid robotic arm and full navigation capabilities into one adaptable platform, which according to hospital officials creates increased accuracy and minimally-invasive surgery.

The increased accuracy brought about from robotic-assisted spine surgery enables surgeons to operate through small incisions along the spine, which can lead to smaller scars, shorter hospital stays, reduced trauma to the body and a general decrease in risk of infection.

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“Robotic technology not only helps improve accuracy, reproducibility and efficiency to complex spine surgery, but it also significantly reduces radiation exposure to the patient, staff and surgeon as an added safety enhancement,” said Ann Lucena, CEO of San Ramon Regional.

The ExcelsiusGPS also be used on posterior fixation procedure from the cervical spine down through the sacrum, hospital officials said, enabling surgeons to accurately perform Sacroiliac Fusions, Single Position Lateral, Deformity and Degenerative corrective procedures.

“We are proud of our excellent spine surgery program and we are committed to providing the highest quality of care for our patients. We look forward to the exciting opportunities and impact this new robotic technology will bring to our operating rooms,” Lucena said in a statement.

The ExcelsiusGPS system is only the most recent addition to the hospital’s growing robotics program. Last fall San Ramon for example San Ramon Regional acquired the O-arm 2D/3D imaging and StealthStation S8 surgical navigation systems to help assist spine surgeons for procedures.

Hospital officials say that together, these two systems help surgeons perform more accurate procedures in the operating room for all spine cases.

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This acquisition was preceded by the hospital’s addition of the da Vinci Xi Surgical System -- a robotic arm that can be used to increase the accuracy of a variety of procedures -- in January 2019, as well as the Mako System -- cutting-edge technology for knee and hip replacement surgeries -- the year before that.

“By adding this new, state-of-the-art technology to our suite of advanced tools, we will continue to be leaders in enhancing safety, offering minimally-invasive procedures, and optimizing care for patients,” Lucena added.

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San Ramon Regional acquires new robotic system for spinal surgery

ExcelsiusGPS system to make procedures more accurate

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Uploaded: Thu, Feb 6, 2020, 9:10 pm

San Ramon Regional Medical Center recently announced that it has become the first hospital in the Bay Area to purchase the ExcelsiusGPS system for robotic-assisted spine surgery.

Designed to improve safety and accuracy of spine surgical procedures within the operating room, hospital officials say the new technology provides improved and real-time visualization of patient anatomy.

“What’s remarkable about this new robotic technology is that it simplifies more complicated surgeries for spine surgeons,” said Hieu Ball, M.D., Orthopedic Spine Surgeon at San Ramon Regional Medical Center. “We are able to see and do more along the spine than ever before. Patients undergoing spine surgery can have a whole new level of safety and peace of mind with their procedure.”

The ExcelsiusGPS combines a rigid robotic arm and full navigation capabilities into one adaptable platform, which according to hospital officials creates increased accuracy and minimally-invasive surgery.

The increased accuracy brought about from robotic-assisted spine surgery enables surgeons to operate through small incisions along the spine, which can lead to smaller scars, shorter hospital stays, reduced trauma to the body and a general decrease in risk of infection.

“Robotic technology not only helps improve accuracy, reproducibility and efficiency to complex spine surgery, but it also significantly reduces radiation exposure to the patient, staff and surgeon as an added safety enhancement,” said Ann Lucena, CEO of San Ramon Regional.

The ExcelsiusGPS also be used on posterior fixation procedure from the cervical spine down through the sacrum, hospital officials said, enabling surgeons to accurately perform Sacroiliac Fusions, Single Position Lateral, Deformity and Degenerative corrective procedures.

“We are proud of our excellent spine surgery program and we are committed to providing the highest quality of care for our patients. We look forward to the exciting opportunities and impact this new robotic technology will bring to our operating rooms,” Lucena said in a statement.

The ExcelsiusGPS system is only the most recent addition to the hospital’s growing robotics program. Last fall San Ramon for example San Ramon Regional acquired the O-arm 2D/3D imaging and StealthStation S8 surgical navigation systems to help assist spine surgeons for procedures.

Hospital officials say that together, these two systems help surgeons perform more accurate procedures in the operating room for all spine cases.

This acquisition was preceded by the hospital’s addition of the da Vinci Xi Surgical System -- a robotic arm that can be used to increase the accuracy of a variety of procedures -- in January 2019, as well as the Mako System -- cutting-edge technology for knee and hip replacement surgeries -- the year before that.

“By adding this new, state-of-the-art technology to our suite of advanced tools, we will continue to be leaders in enhancing safety, offering minimally-invasive procedures, and optimizing care for patients,” Lucena added.

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