News

SRVUSD cancels planned return to in-person learning in January

Remote learning until county enters less restrictive red tier

Amid the worst surge of coronavirus cases in the Bay Area since the pandemic began nearly a year ago, the San Ramon Valley Unified School District Board of Education has unanimously voted to cancel its plans to return to in-person instruction in January.

SRVUSD logo.

After originally planning to return to a hybrid in-person learning model on Jan. 5, the board voted to continue with full-time remote learning during its regular meeting on Tuesday, taking advice from Superintendent John Malloy and staff to do so.

"I know as I share this that this is not what some of our families wish to hear, but I do believe that it is important for me to communicate it to you clearly for your deliberations and decision," Mallory said during Tuesday's meeting.

Recent Coronavirus related data released by Contra Costa Health Services has shown a significant spike in cases throughout the region, with the county's weekly average of newly reported cases reaching 35.6 a day per 100,000 residents as of Tuesday -- on Nov. 3 the average number of cases reported every day was 9.7.

SRVUSD residents have responded to the surge by electing to have their students opt for remote learning over in-person. Prior to the board's decision to cancel plans to return to in-person instruction, 65.01% of elementary and 75.84% of secondary students already elected to remain with remote learning over in-person, according to district officials.

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Teachers have also expressed concerns over returning to in-person instruction according to Malloy, who said, "Our staff has been speaking to us, and though this may not be everyone's experience, especially as we have moved into the purple tier, many of our staff have communicated directly with me and have shared that they don't feel safe right now."

The board voted to remain with remote learning until Contra Costa County is removed from the state's most-restrictive purple tier -- according to California's four tier ranking of coronavirus infection rates -- and into the less restrictive red tier.

When classes do return from winter break on Jan. 5, students will begin remote learning with their new class assignments, ensuring that as soon as it is safe to return to in-person learning the process will be as seamless as possible.

"Opening schools is a community effort. We have to do it together. The district can't do it by itself, teachers can't do it by themselves, students and parents can't do it by themselves. It has to be everyone including the community," Board President Susanna Ordway said during Tuesday's discussion.

"The human factor is the variable in this. I think that (there is) a lot of fear and a lot of concern around everything, even with the hard science of being safe, because we can only control what we can control ourselves," she added. "As long as (the divisiveness around this issue) continues, it makes it hard to come together and open schools safely."

District officials added that additional information and details on how residents can provide feedback to the board will be sent to district families before the end of the day on Wednesday.

Residents are also invited to view a town hall featuring Superintendent Malloy on the district's YouTube channel at 5 p.m. on Wednesday.

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SRVUSD cancels planned return to in-person learning in January

Remote learning until county enters less restrictive red tier

by / Danville San Ramon

Uploaded: Wed, Dec 16, 2020, 12:13 pm

Amid the worst surge of coronavirus cases in the Bay Area since the pandemic began nearly a year ago, the San Ramon Valley Unified School District Board of Education has unanimously voted to cancel its plans to return to in-person instruction in January.

After originally planning to return to a hybrid in-person learning model on Jan. 5, the board voted to continue with full-time remote learning during its regular meeting on Tuesday, taking advice from Superintendent John Malloy and staff to do so.

"I know as I share this that this is not what some of our families wish to hear, but I do believe that it is important for me to communicate it to you clearly for your deliberations and decision," Mallory said during Tuesday's meeting.

Recent Coronavirus related data released by Contra Costa Health Services has shown a significant spike in cases throughout the region, with the county's weekly average of newly reported cases reaching 35.6 a day per 100,000 residents as of Tuesday -- on Nov. 3 the average number of cases reported every day was 9.7.

SRVUSD residents have responded to the surge by electing to have their students opt for remote learning over in-person. Prior to the board's decision to cancel plans to return to in-person instruction, 65.01% of elementary and 75.84% of secondary students already elected to remain with remote learning over in-person, according to district officials.

Teachers have also expressed concerns over returning to in-person instruction according to Malloy, who said, "Our staff has been speaking to us, and though this may not be everyone's experience, especially as we have moved into the purple tier, many of our staff have communicated directly with me and have shared that they don't feel safe right now."

The board voted to remain with remote learning until Contra Costa County is removed from the state's most-restrictive purple tier -- according to California's four tier ranking of coronavirus infection rates -- and into the less restrictive red tier.

When classes do return from winter break on Jan. 5, students will begin remote learning with their new class assignments, ensuring that as soon as it is safe to return to in-person learning the process will be as seamless as possible.

"Opening schools is a community effort. We have to do it together. The district can't do it by itself, teachers can't do it by themselves, students and parents can't do it by themselves. It has to be everyone including the community," Board President Susanna Ordway said during Tuesday's discussion.

"The human factor is the variable in this. I think that (there is) a lot of fear and a lot of concern around everything, even with the hard science of being safe, because we can only control what we can control ourselves," she added. "As long as (the divisiveness around this issue) continues, it makes it hard to come together and open schools safely."

District officials added that additional information and details on how residents can provide feedback to the board will be sent to district families before the end of the day on Wednesday.

Residents are also invited to view a town hall featuring Superintendent Malloy on the district's YouTube channel at 5 p.m. on Wednesday.

Comments

Michael Welch
Registered user
San Ramon
on Dec 16, 2020 at 11:26 pm
Michael Welch, San Ramon
Registered user
on Dec 16, 2020 at 11:26 pm
7 people like this

I'm very dissatisfied w SRVSD not reopening grade schools in Jan 2021.
It's been known for 6+ months that K-5 kids just don't spread COVID or get very sick when they catch it. How dangerous will they be masked up in a room with doors open & a floor fan? Clearly teachers have shown they really shouldn't have a say in whether or not schools reopen. They scream hysteria and won't accept the facts of this virus. One of those is that they are far more likely to get it complaining to each other in the teachers lounge than they are from a child less than 10 years old. I'm assigning the teachers' union ad & school board the grade of F. The facts, not people's feelings, matter. This is just the worst sort of hysterical nonsense masquerading as a kind of social justice. Disgraceful.


Tom Stevens
Registered user
Danville
on Dec 17, 2020 at 6:32 am
Tom Stevens , Danville
Registered user
on Dec 17, 2020 at 6:32 am
6 people like this

So tired of this crap. No fun to live here anymore. Socialists. Spineless teachers and district. Let these kids learn.


H
Registered user
San Ramon Valley High School
on Dec 17, 2020 at 7:31 am
H, San Ramon Valley High School
Registered user
on Dec 17, 2020 at 7:31 am
2 people like this

Dr. John Malloy needs to resign for his continual and constant lies to the community. Here is one boldfaced lie from Dr. Malloy to the whole community:

Q. What will happen if COVID cases increase in January? Will I be able to change to remote?

A: We are opening for in-person hybrid instruction on January 5, 2021 unless the state or county directs the Board otherwise. We will be sure all appropriate health and safety measures are in place.

Clearly, Dr. Malloy LIED to the community here when he alone unilaterally changed the reopening date. If he's not running the school district and instead is just doing whatever the head of SRVEA tells him, why is he here aside form collecting a paycheck? The community and SRVUSD would be far better served with an honest superintendent that respects the community and the job. It is time for Dr. Malloy to resign and sell his lies elsewhere.


Elizabeth
Registered user
Alamo
on Dec 17, 2020 at 8:37 am
Elizabeth, Alamo
Registered user
on Dec 17, 2020 at 8:37 am
7 people like this

You get what you voted for. Two of these five board members were just elected with full endorsement and financial support of the teachers union. If you think it’s the teachers union that’s behind the continued remote learning model, that may be why the board members voted as they did. Personally, I think it’s science.


Malcolm Hex
Registered user
San Ramon
on Jan 1, 2021 at 10:59 am
Malcolm Hex, San Ramon
Registered user
on Jan 1, 2021 at 10:59 am
1 person likes this

The school board should learn from history.

Source: New York Times March 20, 2020

1918 - Spanish Flu

"Royal S. Copeland, a homeopathic physician, was appointed New York City's health commissioner. He arranged with businesses to stagger work hours. White-collar offices would open at 8:40 a.m. and close at 4:30 p.m.; wholesalers would start their days earlier, non-textile manufacturers would start later. Stores selling food and drugs were exempt.

Schools, he reasoned, were often more sanitary than housing, particularly in the slums. New York City schools, moreover, boasted a well-established system of child health monitoring and care. Copeland, accordingly, KEPT THE SCHOOLS OPEN. In addition, Copeland also allowed certain theaters to reman open.

As a result: New York's death rate per 1,000 residents was 4.7, a figure dramatically lower than that of comparable cities ?" Boston's was 6.5 and Philadelphia's was 7.3."

Differences between the Spanish flu and COVID19: Influenza (Spanish Flu) deaths in the U.S. occurred in people under 65, and nearly half of deaths were in young adults 20 to 40 years old. People of any age, even children, can catch COVID-19. But it most commonly affects middle-aged and older adults.

All of that being said, would it not be safe to re-open schools for that particular age group?


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