News

Contra Costa DA won't press charges in 2020 police shooting

Decision to fire on man in Richmond deemed 'reasonable'

The use of force by police resulting in the 2020 death of Juan Carlos Ayon Barraza in Richmond was "reasonable under the totality of the circumstances," according to a report from the Contra Costa County District Attorney's Office released Thursday.

DA's office logo.

Vallejo police received a call about a missing woman, who was last seen with Barraza, at about 8 a.m. on April 16, 2020. A family member of the missing woman said they confronted Barraza, 24, about her whereabouts, to which Barraza allegedly said "something bad" happened to the 29-year-old woman. Barraza then allegedly got into his vehicle and fled the area.

Around 6:45 p.m. that day, a bicyclist riding on Pinehurst Road between Moraga and Oakland saw a sedan blocking the roadway with a white van ahead of the car. As the bicyclist passed, they allegedly saw a man fitting Barraza's description dumping what appeared to be a woman's body off the edge of the road.

Oakland police responded to the bicyclist's 911 call and located the van and the suspect. A chase ensued through Oakland city streets and onto the freeway, ending in Richmond.

The victim was found alive with at least one gunshot wound, but unresponsive. She died in a hospital nearly a month later.

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Police said during the freeway pursuit, Barraza twice waved a firearm at officers and rammed the van into a patrol car at South 37th Street near Carlson Boulevard in Richmond, hitting an officer and trapping another in his car.

Oakland and Richmond police fired at Barraza multiple times as Barraza drove his van into another police vehicle, causing severe injuries to one officer. An officer then fired two rounds at the back of Barraza's van, killing him.

The Contra Costa County Coroner's Office performed an autopsy on Barraza the next day, determining he died from a gunshot wound to his head and chest area, the DA's office said in a statement Thursday.

Officials said Barraza's blood contained 360 nanograms per milliliter of benzoylecgonine, which is a product of cocaine.

The DA's office said it will take no further action in the case and that the family of the victim and the California Attorney General's Office have been notified of the report -- which can be viewed on the DA's website here.

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Contra Costa DA won't press charges in 2020 police shooting

Decision to fire on man in Richmond deemed 'reasonable'

by Tony Hicks / BCN Foundation /

Uploaded: Thu, Nov 10, 2022, 10:29 pm

The use of force by police resulting in the 2020 death of Juan Carlos Ayon Barraza in Richmond was "reasonable under the totality of the circumstances," according to a report from the Contra Costa County District Attorney's Office released Thursday.

Vallejo police received a call about a missing woman, who was last seen with Barraza, at about 8 a.m. on April 16, 2020. A family member of the missing woman said they confronted Barraza, 24, about her whereabouts, to which Barraza allegedly said "something bad" happened to the 29-year-old woman. Barraza then allegedly got into his vehicle and fled the area.

Around 6:45 p.m. that day, a bicyclist riding on Pinehurst Road between Moraga and Oakland saw a sedan blocking the roadway with a white van ahead of the car. As the bicyclist passed, they allegedly saw a man fitting Barraza's description dumping what appeared to be a woman's body off the edge of the road.

Oakland police responded to the bicyclist's 911 call and located the van and the suspect. A chase ensued through Oakland city streets and onto the freeway, ending in Richmond.

The victim was found alive with at least one gunshot wound, but unresponsive. She died in a hospital nearly a month later.

Police said during the freeway pursuit, Barraza twice waved a firearm at officers and rammed the van into a patrol car at South 37th Street near Carlson Boulevard in Richmond, hitting an officer and trapping another in his car.

Oakland and Richmond police fired at Barraza multiple times as Barraza drove his van into another police vehicle, causing severe injuries to one officer. An officer then fired two rounds at the back of Barraza's van, killing him.

The Contra Costa County Coroner's Office performed an autopsy on Barraza the next day, determining he died from a gunshot wound to his head and chest area, the DA's office said in a statement Thursday.

Officials said Barraza's blood contained 360 nanograms per milliliter of benzoylecgonine, which is a product of cocaine.

The DA's office said it will take no further action in the case and that the family of the victim and the California Attorney General's Office have been notified of the report -- which can be viewed on the DA's website here.

Comments

Malcolm Hex
Registered user
San Ramon
on Nov 16, 2022 at 8:57 am
Malcolm Hex, San Ramon
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2022 at 8:57 am

Great job, law enforcement!

I wonder where the anti-cop crowd is now? Hulstead, you out there? How about a little praise for our men and sisters in blue!

Head shot and chest shot = clean shot - so says the DA. It appears Becton is starting to come around.


Jeanne Langley
Registered user
Danville
on Nov 17, 2022 at 10:17 am
Jeanne Langley, Danville
Registered user
on Nov 17, 2022 at 10:17 am

"reasonable under the totality of the circumstances," is a seemingly logical barometer for police-related shootings.

"the totality of the circumstances" is a critical review parameter as this reference point can sometimes present a gray area based on questionable reportages by law enforcement personnel, various claims expressed victims & their families, DA office review, and attorneys representing the families in civil and criminal court.

As Mr. Hex is seemingly implying, police intervention must be 99% justifiable to validate their actions. Otherwise it constitutes an abuse and misuse of authority.


Aron Weiss
Registered user
Walnut Creek
on Nov 17, 2022 at 2:13 pm
Aron Weiss, Walnut Creek
Registered user
on Nov 17, 2022 at 2:13 pm

> ...police intervention must be 99% justifiable to validate their actions. Otherwise it constitutes an abuse and misuse of authority."

^ Concurring as there is no room for human errors or misjudgements if one is a law enforcement officer.


Malcolm Hex
Registered user
San Ramon
on Nov 17, 2022 at 9:17 pm
Malcolm Hex, San Ramon
Registered user
on Nov 17, 2022 at 9:17 pm

@Aron Weiss

You might want to reread that part where you said there is no room for human errors or misjudgment if one is a law enforcement officer.

Uh, people that work in law enforcement are human. They make errors and misjudgments. The problem is the anti-cop crowd want police to be free of error. However, the error lies in the thinking of people who hate cops. But as I have stated in past posts, the anti-cop people are the first to scream for for a cop when faced with violence.

Mike Tyson said it best: Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.

The same goes for the anti-cop crowd.


Madison Wheatley
Registered user
Walnut Creek
on Nov 18, 2022 at 1:47 pm
Madison Wheatley, Walnut Creek
Registered user
on Nov 18, 2022 at 1:47 pm

I don't feel that holding law enforcement officers fully accountable for their actions is being anti-cop.

And neither is opposition to them procuring armored troop carriers and arming themselves with fully automatic weapons.

This is Contra Costa County, not some banana republic.


Jennifer
Registered user
Danville
on Nov 19, 2022 at 8:14 am
Jennifer, Danville
Registered user
on Nov 19, 2022 at 8:14 am

The anti-cop crowd aren't dealing with reason and logic They have a skewed mindset, and they coddle criminals. I've talked to convicted felons (volunteering) who are more supportive of LE. "They're just doing their job." It's sad that men that have spent time in prison are more supportive than "some."


Sarah Jackson
Registered user
Danville
on Nov 19, 2022 at 9:25 am
Sarah Jackson, Danville
Registered user
on Nov 19, 2022 at 9:25 am

I suspect that some of the anti-cop sentiment stems from the intimidating nature and demeanor that many law enforcement officers project towards the public.

Having grown up in a SoCal beach town, the officers there dress more casually (polo shirts with embroidered badges) and ride mountain bikes. They are fully intermingle freely with the locals and outside of issuing a few public drunkenness citations, all is good.

It is the fully uniformed urban and suburban police officers in squad cars who tend to alienate themselves from the public because they are not mellow.


Clay Peterson
Registered user
San Ramon
on Nov 19, 2022 at 12:12 pm
Clay Peterson, San Ramon
Registered user
on Nov 19, 2022 at 12:12 pm

"I've talked to convicted felons (volunteering) who are more supportive of LE. "They're just doing their job."

I have talked to some former convicts too and while some don't blame the police for getting arrested, many conclude that they were 'set up' by a biased judicial system that targets poor whites and people of color.


Malcolm Hex
Registered user
San Ramon
on Nov 19, 2022 at 8:59 pm
Malcolm Hex, San Ramon
Registered user
on Nov 19, 2022 at 8:59 pm

Sarah Jackson stated the following:

“I suspect that some of the anti-cop sentiment stems from the intimidating nature and demeanor that many law enforcement officers have.”

That intimidating demeanor many law enforcement have? What’s your percentage? What you said isn’t based on fact. You assume that many cops are intimidating. Based on what? If you lived in your little SoCal beach town, then how many of those cops were intimidating?

Maybe you should hang around NYPD to understand their culture, and understand what they have to deal with. In fact, go for a stroll in the Bronx and tell us how safe you feel.

Madison Wheatley stated the following:

“I don't feel that holding law enforcement officers fully accountable for their actions is being anti-cop.”

Nobody said they were, including me. Holding corrupt cops is not anti-cop. But you took it out of context. As far as armored troop carriers go, maybe you should check how many people in your BLM and Antifa crowd torched buildings, and also assaulted people - including police.

Two lawyers just paid a steep price for throwing Molotov cocktails at police vehicles during the BLM riots. They were disbarred, and convicted for their actions. Both lawyers will face federal prison time.

Another clown from the anti-cop crowd is going to prison for five years. Yeah, she decided to also throw Molotov cocktails at a police vehicle.

More to come. But it’s funny how no one brings up the cowardly acts committed by the anti-cop crowd.

Chickens are finally coming home to roost.


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